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I met Raquell Holmes in May 2010, three months before improvscience was born. Raquell had been given a grant to explore combining creativity and science. She began leading workshops to analyze the ideas she was shaping into a company.

We create scientific cultures. Do we create ones in which we can grow and develop? Creating work environments that include who we are—passionate, curious, playful human beings—is my passion. I have, and we can, create communities where inclusion fuels excellence, where win-win scenarios are the norm and one’s expertise and offerings do not require the exclusion of others.

To do improvisational theater together, one has to build an environment in which it is okay for adults to be silly and weird with one another. It is risky to play in professional settings. We work years on creating our professional character and to do something that is counter to that character is to take a risk. An important quality of risk-forward environments is being able to fail.

I have always wanted to be a scientist in a position to counter the misuse of science or science-like studies. Although I did not know of his work at the time, I wanted to be my version of Clair Patterson (Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey). For me, there were two scientific “misuses” that shaped my desire for a scientific career: The Mismeasure of Man, by Stephen J.

Science Communication: it’s a phrase that has developed into a field and a call to action within communities of science. Yet, many wonder and debate: what is science communication? The answer depends on who you ask and who you play/work with.

What do you mean "listen"? It’s a counter intuitive lesson and one that’s been reported to improve how you talk with others. Recently, Alan Alda on the Science Friday podcast, noted that to be a better communicator, you need to listen. He says, “[listen] even better than the person you’re speaking with’.

My first blog post that introduced the company, improvscience, answered the question: "What do you mean, improvscience?" More people, across the country and the globe, are asking: what does it mean "to improv" science?

The Communicating Science: Labs to Jobs series of workshops brings improvscience
to Boston University's campus this spring.

Jeremy Scott Hoffman attended the Cultivating Ensembles in STEM Education and Research (CESTEMER) conference in June 2015 in Berkeley and wrote about his experience for our blog.

What have over 2500 scientists experienced with improvscience? Sign up to learn more about our events and services through our newsletter. Our December 2015 e-newsletter highlights our year in review. Enjoy!

E-mail us at info@improvscience.org if you'd like to bring improvscience to your community.